Explain the importance of your consulting team’s ethics and integrity (establish trustworthiness)

COMPANY BACKGROUND

This section helps to describe the background of your consulting team. NOTE: This is where your consulting team will need to PROVE your credibility. ALL OF THE FOLLOWING SUB-SECTIONS MUST BE INCLUDED IN THIS SECTION, UNLESS INDICATED.

Introduction (Paragraph 1)–No sub-section needed

This is a few sentences describing the important components of this section. Preparing the reader for what will be included.

Company Values (Separate Sub-Section with Multiple Paragraphs)

When did this consulting team originate? Why? What teamwork or leadership principles do the consulting team value? (Look for ideas in Chapter 1, 3, 10)
Indicate the consulting team’s experience and competence in this professional field or working with professional organizations or other companies in recommending effective communication strategies?
Explain the importance of your consulting team’s ethics and integrity (establish trustworthiness). (Look for ideas in Chapter 1, 3, 10)
Internal and External Communications (Separate Sub-Section with Multiple Paragraphs)

Indicate how your consulting team “communicates” with their employees, clients, vendors, etc. (tone, motivation, frequency, etc.). Procedures for decision making, team work, etc.
Describe the overall importance of “listening” and “nonverbal communication” your consulting team values.

DIRECTIONS FOR STATEMENT OF NEED:

STATEMENT OF NEED—page number

This section is the first and most important part. Developing this section sets the stage for all other aspects of the proposal. This section indicates in paragraph format WHY your selected department/organization needs your consulting team’s expertise based on the areas of focus. Your team will need to provide some “EVIDENCE” in the form(s) of statistics, testimony, comparison and/or analogies, recent news in the media, success of other departments/organizations, etc. You will need to find or “make up” this evidence by actually researching in the library, internet, or other organizations. I PROVIDED SOME THEORETICAL REASONS IN THE “OVERVIEW.”

ALL OF THE FOLLOWING SUB-SECTIONS MUST BE INCLUDED IN THIS SECTION (you can re-name the sections, but the “intent” of the questions should be addressed),

Introduction (Paragraph)

This is a few sentences describing the important components of this section. Preparing the reader for what will be included.

History of Organization (Separate Sub-Section with Multiple Paragraphs)

What is the history of the department/organization’s image?
Who makes up their internal audience (employees, students, college administration, other departments/organizations, etc.)
Who makes up their external audience (customers, clients, suppliers, government, competitors, etc.)
What types of rewards or benefits does/can your target market(s) expect from this organization/department?
Organizational Needs (Separate Sub-Section with Multiple Paragraphs)

Who will benefit from your team’s proposed recommendations? (consider all stakeholders)
Why does this department/organization “matter” matter to their stakeholders?
Why might your recommendations be necessary or desired by the various stakeholders?
Why haven’t these areas of focus been addressed sufficiently in the past? What are other competing departments/organizations doing to address these areas of focus? Are they effective?
Conclusion (Last Paragraph)

End the section by indicating “In closing,” “In summary,” “In conclusion,” etc. along with a few sentences highlighting the section and the fact that your consulting firm has done sufficient research to address their communication concerns.

DRAFT: INTERNAL & EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION

Even though only one team member is responsible for this section, ALL team members should read it prior to submission to ensure it has all the correct content, formatting, grammar, punctuation, etc.

To the team member responsible for the INTERNAL/EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION section. Please read the directions below carefully.

Finally, use the template provided in this section. By doing so, your section and all the other sections will be formatted consistently. In order to use the template, type over the words on the template with the content you are putting in this section. Remove the box at the end of the template after you have read it.

DIRECTIONS FOR INTERNAL/EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION:

INTERNAL/EXTERNAL COMMUNICATIONS—page number

This section helps to describe the existing communication strategies along with the department/ organization’s SWOT Analysis related to their communication strategies. You will need to include:

Introduction (Paragraph 1)

This is a few sentences describing the important components of this section. Preparing the reader for what will be included.

Current Communications (Separate Sub-Section with Multiple Paragraphs)

This sub-section will be several paragraphs and a chart or graphic describing visually either internal, external, or both forms of communication—break into paragraphs or sub-sections for internal and external so they are separated and not together. Remember, you need to describe the chart/graphic first in writing then refer the reader to the chart, table, or graphic like authors do in various textbooks.)

INTERNAL COMMUNICATION

Indicate in the narrative how the department/organization “communicates” in writing, orally, electronically, via internet, through U.S. Mail, etc. to their “internal” stakeholders—(department–employees & administration) or (organization–executive officers & UWG administration).

EXTERNAL COMMUNICATION

Indicate in the narrative how the department/organization “communicates” in writing, orally, electronically, via internet, through U.S. Mail, etc. to their “external” stakeholders—(department—students, community, businesses)—(organization—members, non-members, alumni, community).

**MANDATORY** THIS CHART CAN BE BOTH INTERNAL & EXTERNAL: You MUST create a chart (or table) describing these current communications and indicate how effective these communications are to the stakeholders (members, vendors, companies, executive board, etc.) –this may be in the form of a feature/benefit chart, frequency table, frequency timeline, etc.

SWOT Analysis (Separate Sub-Section with Multiple Paragraphs)

This sub-section will be several paragraphs focusing on the SWOT topics so they are easy to understand; you must narratively describe in writing then refer the readers to the mandatory chart—look at your textbooks to see how author’s refer readers to figures, tables, and/or illustrations.)

Prepare a S-W-O-T Analysis (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) by describing it first in a paragraph and then inserting a chart/figure of the SWOT Analysis. You will need to refer the reader to the chart in this section. Therefore, you will need to label the chart. YOU MUST CREATE A CHART OR FIGURE FOR THIS PART OF THE SECTION. Again, prior to placing the chart into the document, you must briefly describe the chart and indicate to the reader to refer to the chart/figure, which will be below the narrative.

Comparative Analysis (Separate Sub-Sections with Multiple Paragraphs)

You will need to compare your department/organization to another either comparable or competitive department/organization possibly on another campus or a different department/organization on our campus that may have similar goals and objectives. This section allows readers to see the similarities and differences related to their communication strategies compared to other “similar” organizations/departments. You may want to ask your contact person to indicate what other universities are similar to theirs or if there is another department/organization on our campus that maybe comparable

Conclusion (Last Paragraph)

End the section by indicating “In closing,” “In summary,” “In conclusion,” etc. along with a few sentences highlighting the section and some of the important facts presented in this section.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Even though only one team member is responsible for this section, ALL team members should read it prior to submission to ensure it has all the correct content, formatting, grammar, punctuation, etc.

To the team member responsible for the EXECUTIVE SUMMARY section. Please read the directions below carefully. Be sure you include all the required information…use the template provided below.

Check out the example provided–do NOT copy or you will lose 50 points. Double-check with your team members on what to include (you can look at your team members sections so you can include a summary from each major section).

DIRECTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SECTION:

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY—page number (this is the FIRST PAGE)

THIS IS COMPLETED LAST. The executive summary is the LAST thing you do with the exception of the table of contents and possibly the letter of transmittal. The executive summary is the summary of your entire proposal. You will provide the reader with a snapshot of what is to follow. This statement will contain all of the key information and can be considered “a sales document” designed to convince the reader that this proposal should be considered for support. You will need to include in a narrative format:

Introduction of the Proposal (Paragraph 1)

Statement of Need (Paragraph 2)—This paragraph briefly describes the need for your consulting team to make recommendations to improve the three areas of focus; in other words, the threats and weaknesses facing the organization. (Refer to the Statement of Need Section)

Recommendations (Paragraph 3)—This paragraph should include a brief description of how your consulting team’s recommendations will benefit your department/organization’s target audience(s). You will indicate the department/organization’s areas of weakness or threats and how your consulting team will HELP turn them into strengths and opportunities. (See Recommendations Section)

Conclusion/Your Team (Paragraph 4)—This paragraph is the final, concluding paragraph of this section. Indicate how your consulting team has the best, well-researched recommendations that will assist the department/organization’s areas of focus (strong image, increased membership or involvement, and events/activities to increase exposure and communications). You will need to “pump up” your consulting team’s image by indicating your team’s reputation, previous consulting experience, etc., which helps to establish your team’s credibility. (Refer to the Company Background Section).

DIRECTIONS FOR THE CONCLUSION

Even though only one team member is responsible for this section, ALL team members should read it prior to submission to ensure it has all the correct content, formatting, grammar, punctuation, etc. See example.

To the team member responsible for the CONCLUSION section. Please read the directions below carefully. Be sure you include all the required information…you will need to set this up with three paragraphs and a complimentary close with all your team members’ names.

Double-check with your team members on what to include (you’ll want to take the highlights of the proposal and include them to be persuasive). You may even want to offer an incentive in your consulting fees, etc. to make it more attractive to do business with your company.

DIRECTIONS FOR CONCLUSION SECTION:

CONCLUSION—page number

Your team will need to summarize the main points of this recommendations proposal. This is very similar to what you will write in your executive summary except from the understanding that your audience has ALREADY read this proposal. Whereas, the executive summary, you must write it with the understanding that the audience has NOT read the proposal. Include:

Introduction (Paragraph 1)

This is a few sentences indicating the end of the proposal and how the department/organization should hire your consulting company to implement the proposed recommendations.

Body (Paragraph 2 – ?)

This needs to focus on highlighting the recommendations of the proposal and the benefits. Remember to be PERSUASIVE so that your proposal is approved. Once again…this section MUST be PERSUASIVE (A-I-D-A).

Conclusion (Last Paragraph)

End the section by indicating “In closing,” “In summary,” “In conclusion,” etc. along with a few sentences highlighting the entire proposal and your consulting team’s desire to implement these recommendations.